Rose News for ‘Health / disability’ Category

8th Rose Charities International Meeting: Uganda April 2015: Education and Community Health..

smile-kids1 (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.net/archives/918/smile-kids1) The 8th Rose Charities International Meeting is being held in Kampala Uganda on Friday 15th April 2016 with a later optional workshop session at Mbarara on Monday 18th April.

Rose Charities now has a 20 year history of sustainable program development and management with close to  100% success.  The secrets of these achievements have become clear and will be presented and discussed at the meeting along with other topics.  (see the program below).

All who are interested are welcome. Attendance is free and includes lunch and morning and afternoon session refreshments.   Registration however is necessary(so we know numbers)  by emailing  RoseConference@yahoo.com (RoseConference null@null yahoo NULL.com) .  See you there !

 

program-uganda16 (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.net/archives/918/program-uganda16)

Rose Charities International 2014 Year End Review

Rose Charities International Network:
2014 End of Year Review.

2014 for Rose Charities has been marked both by consolidation in which the well established projects have steadily moved forwards with new initiatives, plans and their implementation, and a considerable delivery of emergency relief for the Philippines. The moves towards increased self sustainability have made progress in a number of areas, notably with the Sri Lanka Medicare program including now a specialised Ear Nose & Throat (ENT) Centre, Cambodia, where Drs Vra and Natalia Heng’s Rose Charities Eye Centre now operates also from their newly built clinic and caters for both the paying, to cover costs, and the poor. Projecto San Gerado Costa Rica’s community programs incorporating tourist and local produce are, now as part of Rose Charities Canada an impressive example of what can be achieved.

Sri Lanka was very active in 2014, continuing to lead the way in microcredit initiatives. It has had to reduce its preschool program due to lack of funding but still manages to run the new cut-down program in this hugely essential area. ( www.rosesrilanka.info )

Rose Charities Sri Lanka wonderfully hosted the 2014 Rose VI International Conference which was a huge success allowing international delegates (UK, Canada, USA, NZ, Cambodia, Japan) and Sri Lanka guests to network, discuss and witness the excellent programs in their area. In addition many of the children in the area worked hard to give delegates marvellous entertainment of dancing and singing which was hugely appreciated by all.

2014 was actually the 10th year after the terrible Asian tsunami of 2004 and it is a true tribute to the energy, charity and dedication of Anthony Richard and his team that so much has been achieved in that time. Over these years, programs have included child and adult health care, post traumatic child counselling, sports for peace and education for all ages, from pre-school to higher education. Poverty reduction through micro-credit and vocational training are now noteworthy as well as special development programs for women.

One of the most notable achievements of 2014 was the re-birth of the Rose Cambodia Rehab Centre (RCRC) ( www.roserehab.org ) which was in final stages of closure though lack of funds. This was also one of the major successes of the Sri Lanka Rose VI conference when Ms Sophak Chim (RCRC Cambodia) discussed issues with a very supportive Rose Charities USA team (Rachel Greene, Arnold Sanchez, Dianne Johnston). Ms Sophak showed that despite the difficulties of physiotherapy being well accepted in Cambodia, the demand for the clinic’s services were on the increase. Rose USA agreed to continue and expand support assisted by Canada and the UK. Previously the main support had come from Rose Australia (the main original founder of RCRC) but this organisation has had to go into a reorganisation phase (possibly with a view to disbanding) due to lack of funding and director base. RCRC has now continued to be successful under new Director Ms Chhouen Putheary. (Ms Sophak continues to advise),

Informal linkage of RCRC with Professor Nous Saroms’s Rehabilitation Surgery department in the PPSC medical centre ( www.cambodiasurgery.info ) continues both in cross-referrals and consultations. In addition PPSC takes many elective medical students who often write to Rose Charities asking for placements.

The Hillman Fund of Rose Charities Canada has also continued its support for physiotherapy treatment and training in Cambodia through assistance to the Cambodia Physical Therapy Association (CPTA) , as well as assisting in eye surgeon training at the Rose Eye Clinic. ( www.rose-eye.info ) . The Eye clinic has now treated some two hundred thousand patients which will rise to close to a quarter of a million within the next year and a half. It carries out both treatment and training and runs a peripheral outreach program. It is amazing to see where this project has gone from both its origin in 1997 as well as its disaster of 2003 when it was 99% looted of all equipment and gutted by thieves. A huge amount of success has been due to the input and assistance, material, teaching, and consultative assistance of Rose Charities New Zealand, ( www.rose-charities.org ) notably Mike Webber and John Veale. Also of great assistance in the development of the clinic and earlier outreach program(s) with IRIS Cambodia (founded by same founder(s) of Rose ) has been Dr Basant Raj Sharma. ‘Basant’ has taken the past few years to open now his own surgical eye clinic in South Nepal which will include a charity treatment component. Rose NZ will be assisting with this program.

Rose Charities Malaysia ( www.myrosecharity.org ) and Rose Charities Singapore ( www.rosesingapore.info ) have continued their impressive programs of local assistance with health clinics, assisting seniors and children’s programs and delivering health services (Rose Malaysia ) to the indigenous ‘Orang Asli’ people in rural areas. Both organisations set wonderful examples of organisations very well integrated to directly helping those in need in their own regions and have impressive memberships of many volunteers prepared to give their time and efforts for others. Rose Charities in Vietnam with its outstanding history of aid programs both with community development and blind home assistance in the Hue area and orphanage support through Rose Charities UK ( www.rosecharities.org.uk ). Rose Vietnam is currently undergoing restructuring but has potential to carry on its work into the future.

The typhoon Haiyan disaster, although in Nov 2013, carried on its effects into 2014 as did Rose Charities efforts to provide assistance. This was achieved on a considerable scale for Rose Charities with direct assistance (medical team lead by Dr Collin Yong in Negros), and indirect though support to partners such as AMDA medical team(s). All phases of the disaster were assisted from immediate health issues through provision of emergency water purification and solar lighting. The work also included rebuilding the health clinic, the walkway access and a number of fishing boats. The island of Negros, Cebu and Leyete were assisted and this has continued to the present time now with support for a newly designed, typhoon-proof home building program with the ‘Movement for Liveable Cebu’ organisation. These homes have now proved their worth by withstanding the much more recent typhoon Haguput. To support this work considerable funds were raised in Vancouver and Richmond working in conjunction with several groups and charitable individuals, one of the most noteworthy being Mr Alan Yong, cousin of Dr Collin Yong.

While Rose Charities is not primarily an emergency relief organisation we have nevertheless been able to provide considerable assistance over the years during major catastrophes, invariably working on advice and in conjunction with local groups on the ground who have requested assistance. With no budget for advertising and promotion it is probable that well over a million dollars has been raised for the disasters we have been involved with, but more importantly, programs continue to this day in Haiti (sports and community assistance) Tohoku (Japan) (AMDA Health Clinic) and, Sri Lanka (see above) and (as mentioned above) the Philippines. What is more, these assistance programs have been invariably without large, expensive infrastructure and working at grassroots level with virtually all donated funds being spent on crucial basic needs.

One area which illustrates this approach is Rose’s assistance to the current ‘Ebola’ crisis. While the current epidemic is in West Africa the disease is endemic in other parts of Africa and has the potential to spread seriously. Early diagnosis, case handling and treatment is essential to increase survival chances and Rose Charities through the Hillman Fund is now supporting a Ebola health training program in Uganda together with Makere University, both in rural and urban Ugandan areas. Dr Andrew Macnab (Brighter Smiles) and the Hillman Fund, with the HEADA Organisation has also initiated a schoolchild early malaria diagnosis program run by the schools themselves. Early results indicate a considerable reduction in school absentee time generated traditionally by the disease.

The problem of safe birthing and motherhood world-wide is a huge one. The want of education, hygiene, medications and trained helpers claims a heavy toll in mortality. In some countries, such as Afghanistan, a maternal and/or neonatal child death occurs every few minutes. Rose Charities Canada is focusing on this challenge with the formation of its Safe Motherhood and Birthing committee which is partly supported by the Hillman Fund and linking with Rose Charities UK ( www.rosecharities.org.uk ) . Programs now include the impressive Guatemala Safe Motherhood ( www.safemotherhoodproject.org ) training project for local Comadronas (birth attendants) founded by Annette Borkent and Dr Ruth Brighouse. There is also a joint initiative in Pakistan with the Frontier Primary Health Organization and a linked program in Afghanistan with Tabish Health and Community Organisation. In this last case recent progress has now resulted in the first two trained community nurses working in one of the main refugee and displaced persons camps near Kabul. One possible future linkage of this committee is to assist with a new RCRC (Cambodia) incipient birth assistance program.

It would be impossible to end this brief review of the Rose Charities International Network programs, without mention of one of its largest areas: education. World Rose groups support primary schools in Madagascar (Rose Madagascar), Zambia (Malambo Grassroots), Uganda (4 schools – Stand Tall Education ( www.standtalleducation.org ) , Volset, and Brighter Smiles (2), ( www.brightersmilesafrica.ca ), Guatemala (Mayan Project of Dr Ellen Coburn www.mayanproject.org ) and Sri Lanka. In addition there are child education support programs in Uganda (Smiles Uganda founded by Mr Galib Kara), Cambodia and Sri Lanka, and a pre-school program in Sri Lanka also. There is higher education support in Uganda, Zambia and Sri Lanka. In the case of Sri Lanka, these programs have produced many graduates including those in medicine, engineering and law. Advanced training programs are sponsored by the Hillman Fund in Uganda and have included ETATS (Emergency Medicine Training program) as well as advanced GP training. In Cambodia students were assisted in accountancy training and now at the Rose Charities Eye clinic there is training of eye surgeons (assisted by Rose NZ and the Hillman Fund). The full title of the Hillman Fund is the ‘Hillman Medical Education Fund’ and this indicates the importance which is put on training by this Rose group. Many special ‘Hillman scholars’ have been supported over the years for advanced and/or postgraduate training. Earlier mentioned too has been the training of midwives and birth attendants. Vocational training programs in Sri Lanka and Uganda (Brighter Smiles) have helped many to find employment in all areas and there is in-house training in the Rose Sri Lanka head office in the management of programs including micro-credit and business planning. A novel peer-to-peer training program is also supported in Uganda.

Left to the end, but perhaps the most important element of all is fund-raising. None of the spectrum of great Rose projects mentioned could exist without the funding. Once again Rose persons continue to show themselves to be stars holding a panoply of the most varied, enjoyable and energetic fund-raising initiatives. New Zealand to New York, Cambodia to Costa Rica, Uganda to Guatemala, Zambia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines -all have, and continue to hold, events and occasions to raise funds. Rose’s very close partner organisation AMDA, in conjunction with Rose, has for the last 3 years held emergency relief fundraisers in Christ Church Cathedral Vancouver bringing in incredible virtuosos from Japan to play alongside local experts. Athletes ride for funds in the international Vancouver-Whistler Granfondo bicycle race. Events have included sponsored walks in Malaysia, musical evenings in New Zealand, ‘bling’ sales in Vancouver, street hockey tournaments in New York city, a ‘Bollywood dance training and performance evening in Vancouver and sponsored scrabble evenings. Rose Charities Australia even at one stage held a paper aeroplane- making and distance flying competition (one of the events I had a great personal enjoyment in attending) . For all these initiatives and also to our accounting teams who year after year assist with the so important baseline work to keep the organizations going – Bravo !… and a huge thank you.

It is very difficult in a limited ‘thumbnail’ report to present anywhere near enough information of the scale, achievements and diversity of the full Rose network. The above is really only a glimpse over its surface. The bottom line however is that all the programs and achievement are due to one overriding factor. That is the amazing people that Rose Charities is fortunate to be associated with. The network is not a centralised unit; it is, in fact simply a vehicle to help move forward the amazing work of individuals and their own groups of project supporters. The ‘Charity Rose’ award is, every year, awarded to one recipient only. There is no mandate for the awardees to be kept within Rose Charities, yet every year to date, this happens. The reason for this is that when it comes to assessment and vote for the recipient, the achievement and dedication of Rose persons invariably are simply the most outstanding proposed within and without the organisation !

No doubt 2015 will have its ups and downs. In an increasingly wealth-polarised world, however, the need for aid and assistance will not be diminishing. Rose programs will be needed more than ever. In addition the environmental changes of global warming may sadly mean increased natural disaster frequency and severity. Rose Charities now has a track record and experience level generated over its 15 years in formal existence. We are an organisation focused on the most direct assistance we can possibly give with the absolute minimum spent on admin costs. Every time disaster strikes we see many big charity organisations taking up large tracts of expensive media coverage, and most carry out excellent (though often very expensive) programs. Yet time and again, such as in Sri Lanka, Haiti and Tohoku, a year or more after the event, the smaller, grassroots Rose supported programs remain and continue to tend to those who have been affected by the event.

The 7th Rose Charities International Meeting 2015 will be held in the Proyecto San Gerado Costa Rica program site. (March 8 – 10 2015) – see ( www.rosecharities.info/events/rose7-info-pack.zip ) As with all meetings it is a huge opportunity to witness the projects and initiatives and speak to those who run them. In addition there are often amazing presentations of local culture that the average person will simply never witness. No donor money is ever spent on these meetings (unless specifically requested for that use) and delegates all pay their own transport and accommodation. They are informal and always prove a superb forum for networking and exchange of ideas. The meetings are not restricted to Rose personnel and anyone genuinely interested is invited to attend.
Rose Charities People and Programs span many ‘New Years’ – Lunar, Khmer, Hindu, Gregorian etc. The last of these however is now. So for this Gregorian New Year 2014/2015 let me take the opportunity to say ‘Bravo’ to all and everyone, givers, receivers (invariably the same thing), whatever involvement level. Its you that makes everything happen. You are magnificent and have my unparalleled praise and unreserved thanks.

me-abby-13 (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/me-abby-13 NULL.jpg)Will Grut MD
Vancouver, Canada
31 December 2014

Building Sustainable Communities: Rose Charities Meeting and Workshop: March 2014: Costa Rica: all welcome !

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Who is Rose Charities helping in Cambodia? Learn their story and become part of it.

After returning from an inspiring trip to Cambodia, I wanted to share with you some of the uplifting stories and important work being carried out by Rose Charities in Cambodia. Here are stories of the courageous patients I had the pleasure of meeting and who are being treated at Rose facilities.

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1. FIRST STOP: Rose Charities Cambodia Eye Clinic

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One of the most endearing people I met during my travels was little Bunmeng, a 7 1/2 month old who travelled all the way from Svay Rieng province, a four hour journey, for eye care. I met Bunmeng and his family as they were waiting to be seen for a consultation. Bunmeng’s mother, aunt and older brother traveled four hours via taxi with him to the Rose eye clinic in order to be treated for abnormal eye discharge. Despite the long trip, Bunmeng was cared for at the Rose eye clinic free of charge. Run by a skilled Cambodian team of experts led by Dr. Hang Vra, the facility is the largest free eye clinic in Cambodia, which conducts 50 consultations each day and performs 50-60 eye surgeries a week.

 

2. SECOND STOP: Rose Cambodia Rehabilitation Centre (RCRC)

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RCRC is comprised of a stand-alone physical therapy facility which predominantly treats traffic accident patients, and a maternity center within the neighboring Chey Chumneas Referral hospital which provides pre and post-natal care. RCRC is led by two part-time Cambodian physical therapists, Ms. Chhay Leangkhy and Mr. Phok Somet, with volunteer support and mentorship by the experienced physio Zoe Blair of New Zealand. RCRC care is offered free of charge for indigent patients, and those who can afford a nominal fee pay per session. Despite the unlucky and discouraging accidents that led patients to RCRC, a pleasant atmosphere permeates the centre.

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Meet Maryne.  Only 17, Maryne comes to RCRC on a daily basis as soon as school lets out, after her left leg was crushed by her moto when a dog aimlessly ran into the street. She began coming to Rose for physical therapy after being treated in a public hospital for her acute care in addition to private home staff. Unfortunately, rehab is not included in hospitals as post-op care in Cambodia, both one of the reasons for RCRC’s inception and it’s high-demand among patients.

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Yi, 69, is a nun who began coming to RCRC after breaking her arm. She initially visited a local traditional Khmer healer, who mistakenly treated her wrist. In the months since the injury, her arm has healed itself, however, Yi’s shoulder was affected from the strain caused by her sling and she’s in severe pain. RCRC is working on a holistic approach to strengthening her upper body.

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RCRC’s newest patient is Chanrith, a 3 1/2 year old born with a congenital disjointed knee. His parents were not aware of the severity of his knee problems until recently, and while Chanrith has the ability to walk, he limps and experiences pain. RCRC is working on developing a physiotherapy program for Chanrith, in conjunction with the local children’s surgery center which is assessing whether or not he will need an operation.
 

3. THIRD STOP: Kosal’s home (a RCRC patient) in rural Takhmao outside Phnom Penh

I have one final, heartfelt story for you.

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The most captivating and inspiring story from my visit to Cambodia by far is that of Kosal. The breadwinner of his family, Kosal (30) supports his 88 year-old grandmother, his parents who cannot work due to debilitating illnesses, and his younger sister. While working at a construction site, the board Kosal was standing on unexpectedly snapped, falling a considerable distance and injuring his hip. Unable to cover the cost of the recommended surgery, Kosal remained bed-ridden for two months without the ability to walk, let along support his family. After learning about RCRC from a relative, Kosal began regularly attending physical therapy sessions at the centre, and in only a few weeks time (with a lot of dedicated care) was able to begin walking again. After marked improvement, Kosal has now reduced his RCRC visits to only once/week, and does the remaining exercises at home. Kosal has returned to part-time work and hopes to be fully employed again soon.

These are just a few of the courageous patients being treated at Rose facilities. In a country where post op physical therapy is rarely offered and where many needy patients are priced out of eye care, multiple Rose facilities are making it possible for these patients to get better so they can live healthy lives. For some that means returning to a job so you can support your family, it means forgetting that you used to limp and enjoying your childhood, and it means spending more time studying and enjoying adolescence. We all have our own stories. Become part of the Rose Charities story and you can help patients like Kosal, Chanrith, Maryne and Yi. #RoseCharities supports #PeopleHelpingPeople. Show your support here (http://rosecharities NULL.org/donate/).

 

Jessica Blake singer and songwriter gifts her lovely song ‘The more I see’ to Rose Charities

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Jessica Blake…. writer and singer of ‘The more I see’

The beautiful singer and songwriter Jessica Blake (http://www NULL.jessicablakemusic NULL.com) has dedicated one of her most lovely songs to Rose Charities.  ‘The more I see’  (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.info/jessica-blake-more-i-see NULL.mp3)  was written during a visit by Jessica to Cambodia where she was moved by the courage of the poor battling with so much need.  Jessica discovered there of the work of Rose Charities (now around 20 years) in Cambodia (http://www NULL.rosecambodia NULL.org) and so with huge generosity dedicated this incredible song to Rose work.   Please click to listen (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.info/jessica-blake-more-i-see NULL.mp3) to if and, if  you are like it and would like to honour tnd thank Jessica by donating a little to Rose Charities efforts use the donation page (http://www NULL.rosecharities NULL.us/get-involved/donate) of this site.  The funds will be used to help the poor of Cambodia in one of Rose’s many projects there

Access for All – Under One Roof

By contributor Diane Frost –


Do you ever dream of what is possible beyond your doorstep? Corrugated steel might not look like a beginning in the developed world. But, in Prey Veng, Cambodia, steel is hope and self-sufficiency. One look at the breathtaking vistas of rice paddies and it is easy to see that these women have united, in one year’s time, over what can build lives as their natural talents gain the right of education via Access For All, a campaign of Rose Charities International.

Twenty inspirational young women, who were referred to Access For All, dream of making lives for themselves out of the skills they gain from working in the household. The household is special too, because the province of Prey Veng offers few choices to women living with challenges that their disabilities have handed them. Yet, they successfully strive to learn to use computers, become apt administrators and disability awareness ambassadors, all the while being valued members of a close-knit family of ladies rising above poverty.

Referred to Access For All by their own loving families and non-profit global organization (NGO) Veterans International, and a fine combination of support from donor dollars, grants and volunteerism the goal for these women is self-support.

Rose Charities’ plan is to educate women such as Chanry through scholarships to Chea Sim Kamchay Mea University where she learned the discipline of accounting and be able to run a business. A project team leader for Access For All now, Chanry said would like to work for a NGO upon completion of her accounting degree.

They attend high-school and University classes majoring in such pragmatic subjects as English, accounting and urban development. Having recently built a new bathroom for $700, the mission would benefit from an in-house teacher of information technology, Japanese and English, and all the more laptop computers, the better than the lone two in use in the office.

These women’s dream of being a part of society, in their homeland where they would have otherwise languished, and the virtues of work and education are providing answers to the challenges of disability and poverty in the gains of fellowship and self-confidence.

Joining the circle of celebrating their brightest New Year yet, they are welcome at the table, at last.

 

The spirit of RCRC Physio Cambodia

Rose Charities Rehab Cambodia (http://roserehab NULL.org)is supported by Rose Charitiies NY

HEADA TEAMS UP WITH STAND TALL

By Dr. Mutabazi Uganda Health and Education

Health and Development Agency Uganda is privileged to have been given an opportunity by Hillman Medical Education Fund (http://www NULL.rosecanada NULL.info/projects/hillman-fund/) of Rose Charities to scale-up Impact Through Peers Project to Stand Tall Education Centre, a no-fee primary school in Kampala Uganda with pupils aged between 9-17 years from poor backgrounds. This is expected to start in May 2012.

The project will be implemented in two phases: Phase I will involve training of Peer Group Trainers (PGTs) who will be selected from the teaching staff of Stand Stall. The PGTs will be trained in Facilitation Skills including Energizers for Workshops, Leadership Skills, Body Changes in Adolescence, Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections among adolescents, Gender and Sexuality, Hygiene & Sanitation, Career Planning , Environmental protection among others. The training shall be interactive and learner-driven and devoid of the traditional lecture approaches.

The trained PGTs will then train Peer Group Educators who shall be selected by their classmates. This will be followed by the creation of Peer Group Clubs at Stand Tall Education Centre.

Phase II: The clubs shall continue to give messages about the above topics in form of poems, drama shows, role plays and health education talks. With the overarching goal of doing more with less, HEADA Uganda has decided to use the Stand Tall Education Centre teaching staff as the PGTs.

HEADA Uganda strives to empower adolescents with information as they sail through the rugged terrain of a continuum of body changes and believes that “an Adolescent with the right Information is an Empowered one” and welcomes support towards this endeavor.

Access For All – Chanry’s Story

By contributor Diane Frost —

Rose Charities’ Access For All is a groundbreaking program that changes the lives of physically disabled young women in Cambodia. Through educational opportunities and disability awareness, young women like Chanry, a Kamchay Mea District of Prey Veng native, will reach her potential and become a role model in the community.

Access For All is changing lives through communal living as well as teaching life and career skills. Plucking uneducated young women whose physical disabilities force them to endure discrimination and granting scholarship awards.

Access For All began Chanry’s life anew.

Chanry began her climb unable to walk. Her devoted parents carried her to school.

Chanry, 23-years-old, remembers “I was very hurt when people in my village blamed me for making life difficult for my parents and called me a useless person.” She was determined to prove them wrong.

Chanry came to the attention of Rose Charities and was granted a scholarship.

Chanry is now living in the Access For All share house in Prey Veng town, funded by $1,200 donated to pay for the land on which the house was built and $5,200 from local community members and international friends to build the house, while studying accounting at the nearby Chea Sim Kamchay Mea University – which she can travel to easily in her wheelchair. She also has the most senior position in the household – she’s the Access For All Project Team Leader.

Chanry’s responsibilities include building greater community understanding of disabilites and the rights of the disabled. Towards this goal, the young women developed a questionnaire to take to people in various villages in Prey Veng. Despite the challenges of rural roads, Chanry travelled to Trabeak village in the district of Ba Phnom and spoke with multiple families.

These were not short visits! Each household wanted to know where Chanry came from, how she became disabled and what difficulties she faced. They knew little about people with disabilities, and said when they thought of people like her, they thought of seeing people on the road, asking for money. Chanry felt strong and confident when telling them about her life and about the discrimination she has suffered because of her disability.

Telling her story and talking about her goals has helped to change this small community’s views on disability, and Chanry is happy and proud of this achievement. This is just the beginning of a future in which Chanry hopes to be a project manager, working to improve access for people with disabilities in Cambodia, or working for an NGO helping to reduce discrimination.

It is just the beginning of a future in which Chanry hopes to be a project manager, working to improve accessibility for people with disabilities in Cambodia, or working for an NGO helping to reduce discrimination.

Community donations, such as $5,724 for High School Education sponsorship for 9 of the young women to attend Ang Doung High School and $8,789 for University Education sponsorship for 11 of the young women – Chea Sim University of Kamchey Mear makes for life changing opportunities for young women living in poverty.

Other equipment for Access for All was provided by Australian Telstra/NAB ‘Helping Hands’ program, which donated $2,000 for laptop computers.

These donations have helped get this amazing projects off the ground. The generous DIAF contribution is $20,000 for 12 months which has been amazing for establishing this project. However that is about to expire. We are in need of funds to support the running costs of this amazing project. Please donate to help us keep this project going.

International Women’s Day.. Rose Charities Celebrates.. !

Rose Charities Celebrates International Womens Day.. !

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Sri Lanka:   Young Women’s Clubs –  8 villages,   Girls sports programs ,  Women’s University Scholarship Program,  Women’s Livelihood Groups (Women’s Support and Women’s Vocational Training.     www.rosesrilanka.info (http://www NULL.rosesrilanka NULL.info/)

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Pakistan:   Frontier Primary Health Care support of  Traditional Birth Attendant training program   www.hmef.info (http://www NULL.hmef NULL.info/)

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Cambodia: ‘Access for All’  program for disabled womens education, support and vocational training   http://rosecambodia.org (http://www NULL.rosecambodia NULL.org/)

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Afghanistan:  Tabish-Rose Charities Training Women’s Health and Computer training program’s  www.hmef.info (http://www NULL.hmef NULL.info/)

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Guatemala:  Safe Motherhood women’s birth attendant and women’s health programs   www.safemotherhoodproject.org (http://www NULL.safemotherhoodproject NULL.org/)

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Zambia:  Womens income generation programs   http://malambograssroots.ca (http://malambograssroots NULL.ca/)

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Haiti:  Women’s neonatal nursing training  www.rosehaiti.info (http://www NULL.rosehaiti NULL.info/)

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World Birth aid pack
saves countless lives

We also wish to laud the women’s programs Rose  has been privileged to have supported, partnered  or planned with, in the past (and perhaps the future too!)  including  the Lumbini Program for training of Women Village Eye Screeners  www.lei.org.np (http://www NULL.lei NULL.org NULL.np/)   and the remarkable  ‘WBDI’ Organization in Samoa,  www.womeninbusiness.ws (http://www NULL.womeninbusiness NULL.ws/)  the One in Three Women Organization (Seattle)  www.oneinthreewomen.com (http://www NULL.oneinthreewomen NULL.com/) and  World Birth Aid (Seattle)  www.worldbirthaid.org (http://www NULL.worldbirthaid NULL.org/)

 

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Haiti Cholera Relief 2010.
Dr Amy Osborne

The organizers of Rose Charities also pay tribute and gratitude to the professional women volunteers (nurses, physicians, counselors, logisticians etc) who have contributed over 50% of involvement, organization and sustainability of emergency relief and ‘post-relief’ operations Rose Charities and close partners AMDA (http://amdacanada NULL.org) have played over the years.  Their magnificent work has helped tens of thousands of victims in many parts of the globe.

(http://4 NULL.bp NULL.blogspot NULL.com/-FCjwaE4qTZk/T1kJIbDIzaI/AAAAAAAACEo/RenvX87R6e8/s1600/amda2 NULL.jpg)
Hurricane Katrina 2005
R.N.Kirsten Reems
(http://1 NULL.bp NULL.blogspot NULL.com/-aiY2zjiYRIQ/T1kLcsBG3bI/AAAAAAAACE4/2dg5lti7l9k/s1600/mary-spencer-treating NULL.jpg)
2004 Asian Tsunami Sri Lanka
R.N.Mary Spencer
(http://1 NULL.bp NULL.blogspot NULL.com/-uYQZMenteXI/T1kMsGhKdzI/AAAAAAAACFQ/_Qx7DdtzNwI/s1600/amda-relief9 NULL.jpg)
Japan Eathquake/Tsunami 2011
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